Common sense may have been shut down, too

Part of the reason so many Americans are fed up with government in general is that too often, bureaucrats display a complete lack of common sense.

During World War II, Joe McGrain of Rochester, N.Y., served aboard a B-26 bomber. That very aircraft is on display at the National Museum of the Air Force in Dayton.

For decades, McGrain has wanted to see his plane again and show it to his wife and two sons. Tuesday, McGrain and his wife went to Dayton. His sons, from Washington, D.C., and New Orleans, went with their parents.

No way, the McGrains were told when they asked to see the B-26. The museum was closed as part of the “government shutdown” that began that day.

Yes, the museum is closed – but some personnel remain on duty there. What would it have hurt for one of them to quietly escort the McGrains in to see the aircraft on which an elderly man once risked his life for his country?

Also Tuesday, 91 veterans from Mississippi visited the National Mall in Washington, to see the World War II monument. They were flown to the capital through the Honor Flight program.

An Honor Flight representative called the National Park Service about the barricade in front of the monument. He was told if anyone tried to enter, they would be arrested.

Tuesday, the veterans, some in their 90s, pushed the barricade aside. Led by a bagpiper, they went onto the monument grounds.

One has to wonder what veterans like McGrain are thinking about the government for which they risked their lives. Common sense, they may conclude, has been told to stay at home during the “shutdown.”